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  Author  Subject: Linux/Internet
Anonymous  

Posted on 05-02-2006 09:45 p.m. ET  reply

I just bought a Linux laptop with the Linspire distro installed. When I take it to work and use the public wireless, I have no problem getting connected to the Internet. But when I use my roadrunner connection at home, my Mozilla browser keeps saying it can't find the page. The green light on the roadrunner box lights up when I plug the network plug into the card showing I have a connection. And the network status screen indicates that bytes and packets are being passed back and forth. I also get a "Connection Good" on the network status screen. But I can't bring up any web pages. Also, I don't get any Gateway or ISP addresses listed on the Details tab of the Network Status Screen. Any ideas on what could be wrong? Thanks for any help you can give me.
Anonymous  

Posted on 05-04-2006 12:10 p.m. ET  reply

Anonymous wrote:
>> The green light on the roadrunner box lights up when I plug the network plug into the card showing I have a connection.

Actually, the green light only means that you have an ethernet connection. In other words, it only means that the cable works. And blinking lights only mean that bytes are being sent across the cable. There is no way to know from the lights whether or not your computer has properly configured network settings to actually communicate with the Internet via your cablemodem.

In order to really help, we need to know what your network is like. In other words, does your cablemodem hand out IP addresses via DHCP or not? If so, then your computer's network settings need to be configured to use DHCP to acquire an address. If not, then you need to know quite a bit more about networking, so that you can manually set your computer's address.

Have you used other computers on your home network? Are they cabled or wireless? Are they Windows or MacOS (and what version)? Is there a way to configure the cablemodem or see it's configuration settings? What kind of info/documentation did your ISP give you when you got the cablemodem? The answer to these questions will give us the info we need to help you out.
sziemba  

Posted on 05-04-2006 11:55 p.m. ET  reply

Anonymous wrote:


Actually, the green light only means that you have an ethernet connection. In other words, it only means that the cable works. And blinking lights only mean that bytes are being sent across the cable. There is no way to know from the lights whether or not your computer has properly configured network settings to actually communicate with the Internet via your cablemodem.

In order to really help, we need to know what your network is like. In other words, does your cablemodem hand out IP addresses via DHCP or not? If so, then your computer's network settings need to be configured to use DHCP to acquire an address. If not, then you need to know quite a bit more about networking, so that you can manually set your computer's address.

Have you used other computers on your home network? Are they cabled or wireless? Are they Windows or MacOS (and what version)? Is there a way to configure the cablemodem or see it's configuration settings? What kind of info/documentation did your ISP give you when you got the cablemodem? The answer to these questions will give us the info we need to help you out. <<

In answer to your questions, the addresses are assigned by DHCP. I have the Network Settings set to the DHCP option. The Linspire people told me to fill in the DNS Server name but the RoadRunner people said to leave it blank as it will be assigned automatically. Our main PC, running Windows XP, has no problem connecting to the Internet via the same cable modem. (We don't have any wireless in the house yet.) I can see the settings and addresses that Windows XP is using but again, it explicitly says that the addresses are assigned via DHCP. There were no instructions given to us by Roadrunner except to plug it in, turn it on, and access the Internet. My wife watched and said all he did was plug it into the ethernet card on the back of the Windows PC tower and turn it on. He was immediately able to access the Internet. There isn't much more I can tell you accept that the status screen on the Windows PC and the Linux Laptop look the same in that both say that the status is connected and both say the speed is at 100.0 Mbps. Also, both have numbers under the packets and bytes sent and received that are increasing. I take it that the ethernet card and cable are good if the green light turns on and data is being passed if it blinks. (I understand that this only means I have an ethernet connection and doesn't mean I have an Internet connection. But then does this mean that the ethernet card in the laptop is good?) When I try to bring up the browser however, that's when things get different. The Linux laptop says my pages can't be found. The Windows PC gets the pages. I might also bring up again that when I take the laptop into my workplace and use the wireless connection, I have no problem with the laptop. Lastly, I want to mention that I do disable the wireless card when trying to use Roadrunner so that there is no confliction between the ethernet card and the wireless card.
Anonymous  

Posted on 05-27-2006 02:40 a.m. ET  reply

sziemba wrote:
>> In answer to your questions, the addresses are assigned by DHCP... <<

Ok, DHCP is much easier to use. Being that the Linspire folks know their OS better than the Roadrunner folks will, I'd recommend heeding their advice over Roadrunners, and put the DNS addresses in your settings manually. But I should point out that if DHCP is working properly, it should be able to take care of the DNS addresses automatically.

From everything you've said, it appears as if the ethernet connection is fine and your laptop ethernet card is good. The next thing you should check is if the linux laptop is acquiring an address via DHCP. I've no idea how to do this with Linspire's GUI, but from a command-line, you can type 'ifconfig eth0' to show the address given to the laptop. If the address looks good, the next step is to make sure you have connectivity with the Internet. It may be that you're having problems with the DNS, and there's a way to test this. Use the following URL in your browser after you think the laptop should be connected:

http://209.217.207.4/

If you get the SYRLUG website, it means you are connected to the Internet, but that the DNS settings are incorrect (DNS is used on the Internet to convert domain names to IP addresses, which means that if you can access something on the Internet by address, but not by name, your DNS settings are bad. Try the above URL and let us know whether not it works. The answer will determine the next step in the trouble-shooting process.
Anonymous  

Posted on 06-07-2006 10:26 p.m. ET  reply

Actually, this problem has already been fixed with the help from someone on the Linspire Forum Message Board. In case anybody else has this problem, I'll detail the solution.

While I couldn't connect to the Internet using RoadRunner, I was able to connect at work using the public wireless system. So, I went out and bought a wireless router and hooked it up at home. I immediately connected. When I mentioned this problem on the above board, they told me some things to try. From what they gave me, they determined that the card was in working order. So, someone suggested I connect a cable directly from the wireless router to the laptop as he had the same problem and that solved it. Sure enough, once I hooked up the cable, the DHCP automatically assigned the IP and gateway configurations and I was able to access the Internet.

In looking back, I realize I had the same problem when I had the Xandros distro on my main desktop PC. However, that was a dual boot system with Windows so I never really tried to solve the problem. I just used the Windows side. There seems to be something about hooking up the RoadRunner cable directly to a Linux based OS that won't work. You have to have an intermediary (the wireless router in this case)in between the RoadRunner cable and Linux PC. We never did figure out why. It just works and we are happy with that. Maybe someone out there can shed some light as to why.

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